Rotary Club of Auckland supports nurses for 50 years

Auckland Hospital Nurse Unit Manager Linda Attwood honoured with Trophy of Tradition.

“I would like to thank my colleagues for the nominating me for this award, and I also thank the Rotary Club of Auckland for naming me as the recipient of this year’s trophy.”

The Rotary Club of Auckland is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Trophy of Tradition Award at Auckland Hospital, which recognises a nurse who has made a significant contribution to the profession.

This year’s recipient is Linda Attwood, a Nurse Unit Manager at Auckland Hospital, who was nominated for the award by her colleagues. Chief Nursing Officer Margaret Dotchin says, “Linda is an extremely valued, highly professional, culturally aware role model for everyone; she is a very deserving recipient of this prestigious award.”

Linda Attwood (centre) with her colleagues who nominated her for the Trophy of Tradition

Linda is known for her phenomenal work ethic. She has recently moved into her Nurse Unit Manager role from a Charge Nurse role within daily operations at the hospital, where she managed a team of clinical nurse managers.

Margaret says that, in her Charge Nurse role, Linda understood the complexities and challenges, having been a Clinical Nurse Manager herself. “As well as having excellent relationships with her team, one of Linda’s many strengths is her patient focused care and providing a holistic approach to support the hospital’s vulnerable patients.”

On receiving the accolade, Linda says, “I would like to thank my colleagues for the nominating me for this award, and I also thank the Rotary Club of Auckland for naming me as the recipient of this year’s trophy.”

The Rotary Club of Auckland has also gifted $6,000 towards the Auckland Hospital Foundation’s Rise scholarship programme, supporting those aspiring to be nurses or midwives who would not otherwise be able to pursue their dreams.

The Rise scholarship programme, run through Auckland Hospital’s Manawa Awhi (nursing development unit), helps students overcome the challenges there are in completing a degree in nursing or midwifery. Rise scholarships provide recipients with financial, practical and emotional support and when they qualify, these scholars are supported into employment at Auckland Hospital.

Auckland Hospital Foundation Director Candy Schroder says, “Thanks to generous donations like this from the Rotary Club of Auckland, we can help build a stronger a more diverse nursing and midwifery workforce. Our programme allows passionate people to meet their potential by removing any roadblocks throughout their healthcare education and training.

“We face a big challenge in New Zealand. With 50% of our nursing workforce due to retire by 2035, and a predicted shortfall of 15,000 nurses over the next decade, we must do all we can to grow our own.”

“With the help of more people and organisations, like the Rotary Club of Auckland, we can create a future where new nurses and midwives can rise to care for the health of all our communities.”

Linda Attwood with Tony Caughey, President of the Rotary Club of Auckland

“Together, we can help ambitious men and women develop into highly-skilled professionals, giving them opportunities to achieve success and make a difference. Linda is a shining example of someone who has built a career in nursing; her Rotary Club of Auckland trophy will inspire those who wish to follow in her footsteps, and we want to help make their dreams come true,” says Candy.

For more information about the Auckland Hospital Foundation’s Rise scholarship programme, click here.

Top photo (L-R): Rotary Club of Auckland’s Kristen Flannery, Jacqui Bernards and Tony Caughey, with Linda Attwood and Margaret Dotchin